Why women use tampons less than men in India

According to a recent survey by the International Labour Organization, the number of women who use a sanitary napkin or tampon dipped in liquid has decreased by more than half in India over the past decade.

But, in a country that has a history of sanitary pads and tampons that have been linked to an increased incidence of urinary tract infections, women’s usage has remained largely stagnant.

The International Labour Organisation’s World Health Report 2017 survey found that, in the last 12 months, only 2% of women in India have used a sanitized sanitary pad or tampons and 7% have used sanitized tampons.

According to Kavita Das, the executive director of the Centre for Women’s Studies, this trend is a reflection of the lack of awareness surrounding sanitary hygiene.

“I think there is a lack of communication among women and also a lack in communication by the authorities and health departments,” she told Al Jazeera.

“The lack of education around sanitary habits is really, really bad.”

For Das, sanitary use in India is not just about hygiene.

She said women are also concerned about the impact of tampons on their health.

“When they’re using tampons they’re putting their feet into the vagina,” she said.

So they want to know if they can use sanitary devices to reduce the risk of infection.””

Women are concerned that if the tampon or the sanitary cloth comes out they’re going to become more vulnerable to infection and also that if they do become infected, they’re more likely to become ill.”

So they want to know if they can use sanitary devices to reduce the risk of infection.

“A study in India found that a whopping 84% of tampon users have not used a reusable pad or sanitary towel.

The study also found that almost half of those women who said they have never used a tampon, have used them less than once in the past month.

A study conducted in India in 2014 found that half of women surveyed said they had not used sanitary products, such as sanitary paper and sanitary towels, in their lives.

Kavita said that while sanitary sanitary items such as tampons may have the added benefit of protecting against urinary tract infection, women should not rely on these products alone.”

Das said that the most important thing to take away from this study is that women should also use their sanitary practices as a means to improve their hygiene and not as a way to eliminate them.””

But it’s not necessarily the most effective way to do it.”

Das said that the most important thing to take away from this study is that women should also use their sanitary practices as a means to improve their hygiene and not as a way to eliminate them.

“We need to change our thinking and our behaviour around sanitising.

If we’re not taking the responsibility, we’re taking the blame,” she explained.”

It’s about taking responsibility for your own health.”

In addition to using sanitary tools, Das suggested that women use their menstrual cycle as a guide for sanitary behavior.

“For the most part women are just going through the cycle and they’re kind of thinking about their periods and then they’re looking at their sanitizers and then their sanitiser,” she observed.

“What they need to do is they have to think about the cycle, because we have to use sanitisers for a cycle, not just for one period.”

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